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Student Nurse Resources - Cardiac


 

Q: I have a clinical on a telemetry floor coming up. What should I brush up on in regards to procedures that I may need to perform or info that would be helpful for me to review?

Tele is pretty straight forward. For the most part you will have cardiac pt without major damage. Dx like R/O MI, C/P hey maybe they will call it Angina. Some will be "Step-downs" from the Units who may have cardiac damage or new onset problems but have been stable for a few days. So, knowing a normal EKG and a "Lethal" one would be good. You should know the basics of a QRS complex and how that relates to what a heart is actually doing. You will probably see PVC's so knowing a bit about them might be nice. Although there are four "Shockable" Arrythmias (forget the fine VF you'll really need a Cardiologist to see that) knowing Coarse VF, a Polymorphic V-Tach and when a Monomorphic V-Tach is/becomes shockable is over the top but impressive and it's not rocket science (guess I shouldn't say heart surgery). No one will expect you to know ACLS (which is what I was talking about) it's complex and although I would assume most if not all RN's on Tele have it, there is alot of information but you should have some basic understanding of what "IS" an algorithm. With any luck you will get to do some EKG's and learn a bit about the common meds used there and how to hook someone to a monitor. This is a good floor to learn how (why) to check the Crash Cart as it's possible to see and participate in a real code, one never knows what will happen. On my first day (ever) of clinical rotation I had a Pt throw an embolis (probably) she was a DNR but clearly A&O-3X I'd never seen any human being die before. I did come back for day two but I really had to think about it that night.

Rick

 

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