s
Home > Resources > Endocrine > Diabetic Simulation
>

Resources

  Pre-Nursing
A & P
Biology & Chemistry
Human Development
"Notes on Nursing"
History of Nursing
Nursing Theory
 
Clinical
  Assessments
Care Plans/Maps
Nursing Procedures
Writing and Reporting
Medications
 
  Select Topics
  Critical Thinking
Current Issues in Nursing
Evidence Based Practice
Practice Questions
Spirituality
Transcultural Nursing
Workplace Advancements
 
System & Disease Links
Cardiac
Ear
Endocrine
Eye
Gastrointestinal
Hematological
Integumentary
Musculoskeletal
Neurological
Peripheral Vascular
Renal
Respiratory
 
  Practice Areas
  Geriatrics
Leadership & Management
Maternal/Newborn
Medical/Surgical
Mental Health
Oncology
Palliative Care
Pediatric
 
Resource Key
Information Level
Beginner/Pre-Nursing Student
Intermediate
Advanced/Detailed
Length
3 pages or less
4-7 pages
more then 7
Authored by
Student Nurse
Nurse
PhD Nurse, MD
Professional Org. Other/Unknown

Nursing Resource Guide

 
 
Diabetes Simulation
In this simulation you will watch as these nursing students assess a man who comes into the ED unresponsive. A term you will hear is: "HHNC" (Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Coma), the newer name for this is: Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State (HHS) read more below the videos..

 

The Debriefing:

 

The condition is characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood sugar, very high with this condition), hyperosmolarity (thicker blood, more particles/cells in blood and less fluid), and dehydration (not enough fluid in the body) without significant ketoacidosis(when the body uses fat for energy it breaks down the fat and that produces keto acids and they are excreted in urine. A quick dipstick tests in urine tells you if they are present thus signaling the body is breaking down fat for fuel.)

Typically an older patient with type II diabetes has an illness, flu, infection, where they are not getting enough fluids and go into HHS.

Unlike patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), patients with HHS do not develop significant ketoacidosis, but the reason for this is not known. Contributing factors likely include the availability of insulin in amounts sufficient to inhibit ketogenesis but not sufficient to prevent hyperglycemia. Additionally, hyperosmolarity itself may decrease lipolysis, limiting the amount of free fatty acids available for ketogenesis. Also, lower levels of counter-regulatory hormones have been found in patients with HHS compared with those with DKA [1]

Permission granted by Marilyn H. Oermann, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF and Carol F. Durham, EdD, RN, ANEF. University of North Carolina School of Nursing. (2008).

These videotapes were developed with funding from University of North Carolina-General Administration through a grant to M. Oermann, 2008.

 

 


Resource Shortcuts
Cardiac | Care Plans | Current Issues | Ear | Endocrine | Eye | Gastrointestinal | Hematological | Integumentary |Medication Calculations | Musculoskeletal | Neurological | Notes on Nursing | Nursing Procedures | Nursing Theory | Peripheral Vascular | Renal | Respiratory
About SNJourney | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Advertise | Contact Us  


Copyright © 2012 SNjourney - All Rights Reserved
SNJourney does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

NCLEX is a registered trademark and/or servicemark of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc